Feature

Goodstock: Rekindling Support for the Ubin Community

What does Ubin mean to you?

For one group of Republic Polytechnic’s School of Sports, Health, and Leisure staff and students, Ubin is like their ‘second home’. Seeing the dwindling business and health gaps for less mobile residents on the island, this community group is hoping more people will return to the island and support residents with ‘the simple things’.

Feature Lifestyle

Meet the Directors Behind Singapore’s First BL Series, Summerdaze: The Series

Boys’ love (BL) dramas from Thailand, the Phillippines, and East Asia have surged in popularity in recent years, with fans flocking to watch 2gether, Gameboys, HIStory, and many more. Now, Singapore might also expect its own BL drama production as Summerdaze: The Series launches its fundraiser to turn it into reality.

We sat down with the web series’ co-directors to find out more about what inspired the drama, the challenges they face, and what this film means for representation in Singapore.

Feature People

Performance With Purpose: This Elderly Theatre Troupe Shows How the Arts Can Engage Our Seniors

Senior theatre benefits our older generation — from the performers themselves to the audience. But could it be for the rest of us too?

Listening to radio plays such as Chap Lau brings the older audience to a period of nostalgia, and the younger audience to a time we know less about. From currency to housing situations, things are constantly changing and getting replaced — but they are preserved in performance.

Feature

Singaporeans Suck at Recycling

Compared to those in South Korea and Taiwan, sorting and paying for the disposal of rubbish seems unimaginable in Singapore. However, perhaps such green practices could pave the way to make recycling a force of habit in Singapore.

So, how have societies outside of Singapore built up such strong recycling cultures, and what can we learn from them?

Feature

Is Singapore Addicted to Poverty Porn?

When you mindlessly scroll through the Internet, you would have probably seen advertisements featuring hungry children crying with pleas for donations. These kinds of advertisements — termed poverty porn — are a common sight here in Singapore, be it for attracting donations or calling for volunteers. While we are accustomed to it, why do we need poverty porn to encourage us to act? And what does this say about our culture?